PLATO-R: a new concept for Antarctic science

Michael C B Ashley*, Yael Augarten, Colin S. Bonner, Michael G. Burton, Luke Bycroft, Jon S. Lawrence, Daniel M. Luong-Van, Scott McDaid, Campbell McLaren, Geoff Sims, John W V Storey

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PLATO-R is an autonomous, robotic observatory that can be deployed anywhere on the Antarctic plateau by Twin Otter aircraft. It provides heat, data acquisition, communications, and up to 1kW of electric power to support astronomical and other experiments throughout the year. PLATO-R was deployed in 2012 January to Ridge A, believed to be the site with the lowest precipitable water vapour (and hence the best atmospheric transmission at terahertz frequencies) on earth.1-4 PLATO-R improves upon previous PLATO designs that were built into ten-foot shipping containers by being much smaller and lighter, allowing it to be field-deployable within 2-3 days by a crew of four.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationGround-based and Airborne Telescopes IV
EditorsLarry M. Stepp, Roberto Gilmozzi, Helen J. Hall
Place of PublicationBellingham, Washington
PublisherSPIE
Pages1-9
Number of pages9
ISBN (Print)9780819491459
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2012
Externally publishedYes
EventGround-Based and Airborne Telescopes IV - Amsterdam, Netherlands
Duration: 1 Jul 20126 Jul 2012

Publication series

NameProceedings of SPIE
PublisherSPIE
Volume8444
ISSN (Print)0277-786X

Other

OtherGround-Based and Airborne Telescopes IV
CountryNetherlands
CityAmsterdam
Period1/07/126/07/12

Keywords

  • Antarctic astronomy
  • PLATO
  • PLATO-R
  • Ridge A
  • Robotic observatory

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