Postintervention and follow-up changes in caregiving behavior and representations after individually or group delivered hybrid Circle of Security-intensive intervention with New Zealand caregiver-child dyads

Anna Huber*, Anne Marie Hicks, Michelle Ball, Catherine McMahon

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The Circle of Security Intensive intervention (COS-I) aims to improve child attachment security and reduce disorganisation by improving caregiver capacities, including caregiving behavior and representations. Research on COS-I effectiveness with these goals is limited and none examines if positive changes are sustained. A recently revised hybrid COS-I protocol (COS-I-RH) incorporates Circle of Security-Parenting (COS-P) material and individual or group delivery options. We examined (1) post intervention and follow-up changes in caregiving behavior and representations after COS-I-RH and (2) if individual or group delivery moderated changes. New Zealand parent-child dyads with relationship concerns (n=36; child age M =35 months) referred to a community-based program completed COS-I-RH. Four caregiver capacities (supportive and unsupportive parenting (CTNES), parenting self-efficacy and satisfaction (PSOC)) were measured pre- and post-treatment, and one year later. Regardless of delivery mode, after COS-I-RH, parents showed large improvements on all 4 indices of caregiving behavior and representations, maintained at one-year follow-up.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages22
JournalAttachment and Human Development
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 17 Aug 2020

Keywords

  • high-risk parent–child dyads
  • circle of security-intensive intervention
  • attachment- based intervention
  • follow-up study
  • caregiving behavior and representations

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