Practical 3D tomographic method for correcting patient head motion in clinical SPECT

R. R. Fulton*, S. Eberl, S. R. Meikle, B. F. Hutton, M. Braun

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionpeer-review

    Abstract

    Patient motion during brain SPECT studies can degrade resolution and introduce distortion. We have developed a correction method which incorporates a motion tracking system to monitor the position and orientation of the patient's head during acquisition. Correction is achieved by spatially repositioning projections according to measured head movements and reconstructing these projections with a fully three-dimensional (3D) algorithm. The method has been evaluated in SPECT studies of the Hoffman 3D brain phantom performed on a triple head camera with fan beam collimation. Movements were applied to the phantom and recorded by a head tracker during SPECT acquisition. Fully 3D reconstruction was performed using the motion data provided by the tracker. Correction accuracy was assessed by comparing the corrected and uncorrected studies with a motion free study, visually and by calculating mean squared error (MSE). In all studies, motion correction reduced distortion and improved MSE by a factor of 2 or more. We conclude that this method can compensate for head motion under clinical SPECT imaging conditions.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationIEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference
    Pages1770-1775
    Number of pages6
    Volume3
    Publication statusPublished - 1999
    EventProceedings of the 1998 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record - Toronto, Que, Can
    Duration: 8 Nov 199814 Nov 1998

    Other

    OtherProceedings of the 1998 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record
    CityToronto, Que, Can
    Period8/11/9814/11/98

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