Precambrian multi-stage crustal evolution in the Bamble sector of south Norway

Pb isotopic evidence from a Sveconorwegian deep-seated granitic intrusion

T. Andersen*, P. Hagelia, M. J. Whitehouse

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    22 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The Precambrian Ubergsmoen augen gneiss in the Bamble sector of south Norway is a dry, syntectonic charnockitic intrusion, which was emplaced at amphibolite- to granulite-facies conditions in the Sveconorwegian orogeny (∼ 1120 Ma). The present-day 206Pb 204Pb and 207Pb 204Pb ratios show restricted variation ( 206Pb 204Pb = 17.566-17.938, 207Pb 204Pb = 15.459-15.590 in whole rocks; and 206Pb 204Pb = 17.159-17.350, 207Pb 204Pb = 15.451-15.487 in feldspar), whereas the 208Pb 204Pb ratio has a wider range of variation in whole rocks (36.571-42.200), but not in feldspars (36.487-37.054). These values reflect a 238U 204Pb (μ) of 2-6 since the Sveconorwegian, and a variable Th/U ratio (2-20). At the time of final U-Pb differentiation, homogenization of the Pb isotopes was imperfect. The data therefore do not allow Pb-Pb isochron dating, but are well suited for model calculations. The isotopic evolution of Pb can be reproduced by a three-stage model, involving: (1) a mantle stage ending at 1.9-1.6 Ga; (2) extraction of a crustal precursor at 1.9-1.6 Ga, and differentiation of a LILE-enriched component (μ = 14-22); and (3) anatexis, igneous differentiation, emplacement and subsequent metamorphism at ≈ 1.12 Ga. The granitic intrusion acquired its low U/Pb ratio by magmatic differentiation processes, rather than by fluid-induced U loss at high-grade metamorphic conditions.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)327-343
    Number of pages17
    JournalChemical Geology
    Volume116
    Issue number3-4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 5 Oct 1994

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