Predictors of muscularity-oriented disordered eating behaviors in U.S. young adults: a prospective cohort study

Jason M. Nagata, Stuart B. Murray, Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, Andrea K. Garber, Deborah Mitchison, Scott Griffiths

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To determine adolescent predictors of muscularity-oriented disordered eating behaviors in young men and women using a nationally representative longitudinal sample in the United States and to examine differences by sex. Method: We used nationally representative longitudinal cohort data collected from baseline (11–18 years old, 1994–1995) and 7-year follow-up (18–24 years old, 2001–2002) of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health. We examined adolescent demographic, behavioral, and mental health predictors of young adult muscularity-oriented disordered eating behaviors defined as eating more or differently to gain weight or bulk up, supplements to gain weight or bulk up, or androgenic anabolic steroid use at 7-year follow-up. Results: Of the 14,891 included participants, 22% of males and 5% of females reported any muscularity-oriented disordered eating behavior at follow-up in young adulthood. Factors recorded at adolescence that were prospectively associated with higher odds of muscularity-oriented disordered eating in both sexes included black race, exercising to gain weight, self-perception of being underweight, and lower body mass index z-score. In addition, participation in weightlifting; roller-blading, roller-skating, skate-boarding, or bicycling; and alcohol among males and depressive symptoms among females during adolescence were associated with higher odds of muscularity-oriented disordered eating in young adulthood. Conclusions: Interventions to prevent muscularity-oriented disordered eating behaviors may target at-risk youth, particularly those of black race or who engage in exercise to gain weight. Future research should examine longitudinal health outcomes associated with muscularity-oriented disordered eating behaviors.

LanguageEnglish
Pages1380–1388
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Eating Disorders
Volume52
Issue number12
Early online date20 Jun 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2019

Fingerprint

Feeding Behavior
Young Adult
Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies
Weight Gain
Eating
Weight Perception
Testosterone Congeners
Bicycling
Skating
Thinness
Health
Self Concept
Sex Characteristics
Longitudinal Studies
Mental Health
Body Mass Index
Alcohols
Demography
Exercise

Keywords

  • body image
  • males
  • muscle
  • steroids
  • disordered eating
  • weight control
  • young adults

Cite this

Nagata, Jason M. ; Murray, Stuart B. ; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten ; Garber, Andrea K. ; Mitchison, Deborah ; Griffiths, Scott. / Predictors of muscularity-oriented disordered eating behaviors in U.S. young adults : a prospective cohort study. In: International Journal of Eating Disorders. 2019 ; Vol. 52, No. 12. pp. 1380–1388.
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Predictors of muscularity-oriented disordered eating behaviors in U.S. young adults : a prospective cohort study. / Nagata, Jason M.; Murray, Stuart B.; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Garber, Andrea K.; Mitchison, Deborah; Griffiths, Scott.

In: International Journal of Eating Disorders, Vol. 52, No. 12, 12.2019, p. 1380–1388.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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