Preference trial of internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy comparing standard weekly versus optional weekly therapist support

H. D. Hadjistavropoulos, L. H. Schneider, S. Mehta, E. Karin, B. F. Dear, N. Titov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Emerging evidence from research trials suggests that Internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy (ICBT) produces similar symptom improvements whether patients receive weekly therapist support (standard support) or therapist support only when requested (optional support). It remains unknown, however, how many patients receiving ICBT as part of routine clinical care would prefer optional support compared to standard support and how outcomes compare when patients select their preferred treatment option. In this uncontrolled trial, we investigated patient preference and outcomes for standard versus optional support among patients with depression and or anxiety who were offered an 8-week transdiagnostic ICBT intervention in routine care. Of 401 patients accepted for ICBT, 22% selected optional support and 78% selected standard support. At assessment, patients who selected optional support had lower symptoms of anxiety and panic than patients who selected standard support. At post-treatment, both groups achieved similar large improvements in symptoms of anxiety and depression, with improvements sustained at 3-month follow-up. Patients receiving optional support sent and received fewer messages compared to patients receiving standard support. This study demonstrates the potential of optional therapist support to meet the needs and preferences of patients and to also reduce therapist costs in routine care.

LanguageEnglish
Pages51-60
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Anxiety Disorders
Volume63
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2019

Fingerprint

Cognitive Therapy
Internet
Anxiety
Patient Preference
Depression
Panic
Costs and Cost Analysis
Therapeutics
Research

Bibliographical note

Copyright the Author(s) 2019. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

Keywords

  • depression
  • generalized anxiety
  • internet-delivered
  • therapist-assisted
  • cognitive behaviour therapy
  • patient preference

Cite this

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abstract = "Emerging evidence from research trials suggests that Internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy (ICBT) produces similar symptom improvements whether patients receive weekly therapist support (standard support) or therapist support only when requested (optional support). It remains unknown, however, how many patients receiving ICBT as part of routine clinical care would prefer optional support compared to standard support and how outcomes compare when patients select their preferred treatment option. In this uncontrolled trial, we investigated patient preference and outcomes for standard versus optional support among patients with depression and or anxiety who were offered an 8-week transdiagnostic ICBT intervention in routine care. Of 401 patients accepted for ICBT, 22{\%} selected optional support and 78{\%} selected standard support. At assessment, patients who selected optional support had lower symptoms of anxiety and panic than patients who selected standard support. At post-treatment, both groups achieved similar large improvements in symptoms of anxiety and depression, with improvements sustained at 3-month follow-up. Patients receiving optional support sent and received fewer messages compared to patients receiving standard support. This study demonstrates the potential of optional therapist support to meet the needs and preferences of patients and to also reduce therapist costs in routine care.",
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Preference trial of internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy comparing standard weekly versus optional weekly therapist support. / Hadjistavropoulos, H. D.; Schneider, L. H.; Mehta, S.; Karin, E.; Dear, B. F.; Titov, N.

In: Journal of Anxiety Disorders, Vol. 63, 04.2019, p. 51-60.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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