Preliminary investigations into the Australian English articulatory vowel space

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionpeer-review

    Abstract

    Articulation of vowels produced by a single speaker of Australian English in CVC contexts was examined using Electromagnetic Articulography. Dorsal articulatory activity for each vowel was compared by tracking the midsagittal trajectories of the tongue body. Articulatory targets were determined and a companion articulatory vowel space constructed. Comparison of dorsal trajectories of vowel pairs /ɐː-ɐ/, /eː-e/, /oː-ɔ/ confirms a close articulatory relationship between long-short pairs that has previously only been examined in the acoustic domain. Long vowels were characterised by greater excursion from the centre of the midsagittal articulatory space, compared to their short equivalents.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings of the Sixteenth Australasian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology
    EditorsChristopher Carignan, Michael D. Tyler
    Place of PublicationCanberra, ACT
    PublisherAustralasian Speech Science and Technology Association (ASSTA)
    Pages117-120
    Number of pages4
    Publication statusPublished - 2016
    EventAustralasian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology (16th : 2016) - Parramatta, Australia
    Duration: 6 Dec 20169 Dec 2016
    Conference number: 16th

    Publication series

    NameProceedings of the Australasian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology
    PublisherAustralasian Speech Science and Technology Association (ASSTA)
    ISSN (Electronic)2207-1296

    Conference

    ConferenceAustralasian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology (16th : 2016)
    Abbreviated titleSST2016
    CountryAustralia
    CityParramatta
    Period6/12/169/12/16

    Keywords

    • Vowel Production
    • Australian English
    • Articulatory Phonetics
    • Electromagnetic Articulography
    • Kinematics

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