Preliminary results on acceptance, feasibility, and subjective efficacy of the add-on group intervention metacognitive training for borderline patients

Lisa Schilling*, Steffen Moritz, Ulf Köther, Matthias Nagel

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The add-on intervention " metacognitive training for borderline patients (B-MCT)" targets cognitive biases in patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD). We aimed to evaluate acceptance, feasibility, and subjective use of this group intervention. Methods: Forty-eight inpatients with BPD were randomly assigned to 8 sessions of B-MCT versus an active control intervention (progressive muscle relaxation). Subjective use was assessed after 4 weeks. Results: B-MCT yielded significantly superior scores relative to the control group on several parameters, for example, use, fun, recommendation, and subjective improvements in symptomatology and cognitive abilities (e.g., perspective taking). Conclusions: The trial provides preliminary evidence for the acceptance and feasibility of metacognitive training in BPD. However, randomized controlled trials with larger samples and symptomatic outcomes are needed to investigate the specific impact of B-MCT on psychopathology and cognition.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)153-164
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Cognitive Psychotherapy
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Borderline personality disorder
  • Cognition
  • Cognitive biases
  • Metacognitive training

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