Preliminary study of relationships between hypnotic susceptibility and personality disorder functioning styles in healthy volunteers and personality disorder patients

Fenghua Wang, Wanzhen Chen, Jingyi Huang, Peiwei Xu, Wei He, Hao Chai, Junpeng Zhu, Wenjun Yu, Li Chen*, Wei Wang

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Hypnotic susceptibility is one of the stable characteristics of individuals, but not closely related to the personality traits such as those measured by the five-factor model in the general population. Whether it is related to the personality disorder functioning styles remains unanswered.Methods: In 77 patients with personality disorders and 154 healthy volunteers, we administered the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale: Form C (SHSSC) and the Parker Personality Measure (PERM) tests.Results: Patients with personality disorders showed higher passing rates on SHSSC Dream and Posthypnotic Amnesia items. No significant correlation was found in healthy volunteers. In the patients however, SHSSC Taste hallucination (β = 0.26) and Anosmia to Ammonia (β = -0.23) were significantly correlated with the PERM Borderline style; SHSSC Posthypnotic Amnesia was correlated with the PERM Schizoid style (β = 0.25) but negatively the PERM Narcissistic style (β = -0.23).Conclusions: Our results provide limited evidence that could help to understand the abnormal cognitions in personality disorders, such as their hallucination and memory distortions.

Original languageEnglish
Article number121
Pages (from-to)1-5
Number of pages5
JournalBMC Psychiatry
Volume11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Jul 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Hypnotic susceptibility
  • Personality disorder functioning style
  • Posthypnotic amnesia
  • Taste hallucination

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