Presence and predictors of persistent pain among persons who sustained an injury in a road traffic crash

B. Gopinath, J. Jagnoor, M. Nicholas, F. Blyth, Ian A. Harris, P. Casey, I. D. Cameron

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: There is a paucity of prospective studies with long follow-up that have examined a wide range of correlates associated with persistent pain outcomes in persons who sustained a mild or moderate injury in a road traffic crash. This study aimed to establish the independent predictors of pain severity over 24 months. Methods: A total of 364, 284 and 252 persons with mild/moderate musculoskeletal injuries sustained in a vehicle-related crash participated in telephone interviews in the subacute phase, and at 12 and 24 months, respectively. The numeric rating scale (NRS) assessed pain severity. Pain-Related Self-Statements Scale-Catastrophizing (PRSS-Catastrophizing) and the Short Form Orebro Musculoskeletal Pain Screening Questionnaire (OMPSQ) were also administered. Results: After multivariable adjustment, each 1 SD increase in Short Form-12 Physical Component Score (SF-12 PCS) in the subacute phase was associated with 0.73 (p = 0.002) and 1.11 (p < 0.0001) decrease in NRS scores after 12 and 24 months, respectively. Each unit increase in the PRSS-Catastrophizing score in the subacute phase was associated with 0.54 (p = 0.001) and 0.43 (p = 0.03) increase in NRS scores 12 and 24 months later, respectively. Subacute phase OMPSQ scores were positively associated with NRS scores at 12- and 24-month follow-ups (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Self-perceived physical well-being, pain-related work disability and pain catastrophizing could play a role in determining long-term pain-related outcomes following traffic-related injuries.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1111-1118
Number of pages8
JournalEuropean Journal of Pain
Volume19
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sept 2015
Externally publishedYes

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