Prevalence and clinical differences of suicidal thoughts and behaviors in a community sample of youth receiving cognitive-behavioral therapy for anxiety

Nicole M. McBride*, Carly Johnco, Alison Salloum, Adam B. Lewin, Eric A. Storch

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the incidence of suicidal thoughts and behaviors in youth with anxiety before initiating cognitive behavioral therapy, as well as the emergence of suicidal thoughts and behaviors during treatment. Overall, 30% of youth experienced suicidal thoughts and behaviors. Prior to treatment, 24% reported suicidal thoughts and behaviors, and 13.1% endorsed suicidal thoughts and behaviors during treatment. More than half who endorsed suicidal thoughts and behaviors during treatment were newly identified cases not detected prior to treatment. Disagreement among parent- and child-report measures of suicidality was found at baseline. Youth who experienced suicidal thoughts and behaviors had higher levels of loneliness, depressive symptoms, overt peer victimization, functional impairment, and externalizing symptoms. Findings suggest that the assessment of suicidality at a single time-point and from one informant is not sufficient to identify at-risk youth. Ongoing assessment of suicidal risk during treatment is important in this population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)705–713
Number of pages9
JournalChild Psychiatry and Human Development
Volume48
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2017
Externally publishedYes

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Keywords

  • anxiety
  • suicidal ideation
  • youth

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