Prevalence of central auditory processing (CAP) abnormality in an older Australian Population: The Blue Mountains hearingstudy

Maryanne Golding*, Nan Carter, Paul Mitchell, Linda J. Hood

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    22 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Age-related central auditory processing (CAP) abnormality has been described in many studies with widely varying prevalence reported. To date, there has been only one population study to report prevalence for this age-related condition, and these rates were significantly lower than in reports from clinical studies. The present study reports findings from a recent population study in which 2,015 Australians aged 55 years and older living in a defined area west of Sydney were assessed with a battery of behavioral and electrophysiological auditory tests. This battery included speech measures from which a high overall prevalence rate (76.4%) of CAP abnormalities was found, in keeping with previous clinical studies. While gender differences were dependent on the test measure, the number of abnormal test outcomes increased systematically with age. Hearing loss and abnormal cognitive function, however, did not systematically increase with number of abnormal test outcomes.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)633-642
    Number of pages10
    JournalJournal of the American Academy of Audiology
    Volume15
    Issue number9
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Oct 2004

    Keywords

    • Aging
    • Central auditory disorder
    • Hearing loss
    • Prevalence

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