Processing style and social comparison outcomes: Assimilation and contrast effects in automatic behaviour and self-evaluation

Lauren O'Driscoll*, Eugene Chekaluk

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

    Abstract

    The importance of one's self-concept has long been recognised in personality research. Social comparison theory suggests that individuals compare themselves with others in order to evaluate their own opinions and abilities (Festinger, 1954). Based on Förster, Liberman and Kuschel's (2008) global/local model (GLOMO) of assimilation and contrast, the effect of global versus local processing style on behavioural and selfevaluative social comparison outcomes was investigated. The sample consisted of 93 undergraduates (23 males and 70 females). Participants were first primed with global, local or global/local processing, and were then exposed to either an upward comparison target or a control narrative. Assimilation and contrast effects were assessed using a behavioural measure (Information Subtest of the Multidimensional Aptitude Battery II), and a self-evaluation questionnaire. A 2 x 3 factorial design was utilised. The results demonstrated that although GLOMO was generally unsupported for automatic behaviour and self-evaluation, language and gender were shown to partially moderate the effects of processing style and social comparison on assimilation and contrast.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationPersonality and Individual Differences: Theory, Assessment, and Application
    EditorsNiko Tiliopoulos, Simon Boag
    Place of PublicationHauppauge, NY
    PublisherNova Science Publishers
    Pages51-65
    Number of pages15
    ISBN (Print)9781611220704
    Publication statusPublished - 2011

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