Progression from mild cognitive impairment to dementia: a 3-year longitudinal study

Henry Brodaty*, Michael H. Connors, David Ames, Michael Woodward, PRIME study group

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine characteristics that predict the progression from mild cognitive impairment to dementia.

Methods: Of 970 patients recruited from nine memory clinics around Australia, 185 had mild cognitive impairment diagnosed. Measures of cognitive ability, functional ability, and neuropsychiatric symptoms were completed at baseline and over 3 years of follow up.

Results: Over 3 years, 52 (28%) patients with mild cognitive impairment developed dementia. Older age, lower cognitive ability at baseline, and faster decline in cognitive ability over the first 6 months of follow up, but not depression, predicted progression to dementia.

Conclusions: The findings confirm that simple clinical data such as age, cognitive ability at baseline, and rate of cognitive decline are important predictors of progression from mild cognitive impairment to dementia over 3 years.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1137-1142
Number of pages6
JournalAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
Volume48
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • dementia
  • depression
  • longitudinal studies
  • mild cognitive impairment
  • risk factors

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