Prosodic licensing of determiners in children's early French

Annie Tremblay, Katherine Demuth

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

Abstract

This study investigates possible prosodic explanations for children's variable production of French determiners. Spontaneous production data from two French-speaking children, Tim and Marie (age 1;5-2;5), were analyzed. The results show a clear effect of prosodic restrictions on the children's determiner production, with determiners appearing first with monosyllabic words, next with disyllabic words, and finally with trisyllabic words. The results also show that the individual differences between the two children can be accounted for in terms of differential access to the Prosodic Hierarchy. Prosodic constraints thus provide a framework for understanding the variability in children's early production of French determiners.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 2nd Conference on Generative Approaches to Language Acquisition North America (GALANA)
EditorsAlyona Belikova, Luisa Meroni, Mari Umeda
Place of PublicationSomerville, MA
PublisherCascadilla Proceedings Project
Pages426-436
Number of pages11
ISBN (Print)9781574734195
Publication statusPublished - 2007
Externally publishedYes
EventGenerative Approaches to Language Acquisition North America (2nd : 2006) - Montreal
Duration: 17 Aug 200619 Aug 2006

Conference

ConferenceGenerative Approaches to Language Acquisition North America (2nd : 2006)
CityMontreal
Period17/08/0619/08/06

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Prosodic licensing of determiners in children's early French'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Tremblay, A., & Demuth, K. (2007). Prosodic licensing of determiners in children's early French. In A. Belikova, L. Meroni, & M. Umeda (Eds.), Proceedings of the 2nd Conference on Generative Approaches to Language Acquisition North America (GALANA) (pp. 426-436). Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Proceedings Project.