Protein S100 as outcome predictor after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and targeted temperature management at 33 °C and 36 °C

Pascal Stammet*, Josef Dankiewicz, Niklas Nielsen, François Fays, Olivier Collignon, Christian Hassager, Michael Wanscher, Johan Undèn, Jorn Wetterslev, Tommaso Pellis, Anders Aneman, Jan Hovdenes, Matt P. Wise, Georges Gilson, David Erlinge, Janneke Horn, Tobias Cronberg, Michael Kuiper, Jesper Kjaergaard, Yvan GascheYvan Devaux, Hans Friberg, Target Temperature Management after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest (TTM) trial investigators

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

42 Citations (Scopus)
6 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background: We aimed to investigate the diagnostic performance of S100 as an outcome predictor after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and the potential influence of two target temperatures (33 °C and 36 °C) on serum levels of S100. Methods: This is a substudy of the Target Temperature Management after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest (TTM) trial. Serum levels of S100 were measured a posteriori in a core laboratory in samples collected at 24, 48, and 72 h after OHCA. Outcome at 6 months was assessed using the Cerebral Performance Categories Scale (CPC 1-2 = good outcome, CPC 3-5 = poor outcome). Results: We included 687 patients from 29 sites in Europe. Median S100 values were higher in patients with a poor outcome at 24, 48, and 72 h: 0.19 (IQR 0.10-0.49) versus 0.08 (IQR 0.06-0.11) μg/ml, 0.16 (IQR 0.10-0.44) versus 0.07 (IQR 0.06-0.11) μg/L, and 0.13 (IQR 0.08-0.26) versus 0.06 (IQR 0.05-0.09) μg/L (p < 0.001), respectively. The ability to predict outcome was best at 24 h with an AUC of 0.80 (95% CI 0.77-0.83). S100 values were higher at 24 and 72 h in the 33 °C group than in the 36 °C group (0.12 [0.07-0.22] versus 0.10 [0.07-0.21] μg/L and 0.09 [0.06-0.17] versus 0.08 [0.05-0.10], respectively) (p < 0.02). In multivariable analyses including baseline variables and the allocated target temperature, the addition of S100 improved the AUC from 0.80 to 0.84 (95% CI 0.81-0.87) (p < 0.001), but S100 was not an independent outcome predictor. Adding S100 to the same model including neuron-specific enolase (NSE) did not further improve the AUC. Conclusions: The allocated target temperature did not affect S100 to a clinically relevant degree. High S100 values are predictive of poor outcome but do not add value to present prognostication models with or without NSE. S100 measured at 24 h and afterward is of limited value in clinical outcome prediction after OHCA. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01020916. Registered on 25 November 2009.

Original languageEnglish
Article number153
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalCritical Care
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Jun 2017
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Copyright the Author(s) 2017. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

Keywords

  • Biomarker
  • Cerebral performance
  • Neuroprognostication
  • Prognosis
  • S100

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Protein S100 as outcome predictor after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and targeted temperature management at 33 °C and 36 °C'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this