Proteomic response of the biological control fungus Trichoderma atroviride to growth on the cell walls of Rhizoctonia solani

Jasmine Grinyer*, Sybille Hunt, Matthew McKay, Ben R. Herbert, Helena Nevalainen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Trichoderma atroviride has a natural ability to parasitise phytopathogenic fungi such as Rhizoctonia solani and Botrytis cinerea, therefore providing an environmentally sound alternative to chemical fungicides in the management of these pathogens. Two-dimensional electrophoresis was used to display cellular protein patterns of T. atroviride (T. harzianum P1) grown on media containing either glucose or R. solani cell walls. Protein profiles were compared to identify T. atroviride proteins up-regulated in the presence of the R. solani cell walls. Twenty-four protein spots were identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography mass spectrometry and N-terminal sequencing. Identified up-regulated proteins include known fungal cell wall-degrading enzymes such as N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase and 42-kDa endochitinase. Three novel proteases of T. atroviride were identified, containing sequence similarity to vacuolar serine protease, vacuolar protease A and a trypsin-like protease from known fungal proteins. Eukaryotic initiation factor 4a, superoxide dismutase and a hypothetical protein from Neurospora crassa were also up-regulated as a response to R. solani cell walls. Several cell wall-degrading enzymes were identified from the T. atroviride culture supernatant, providing further evidence that a cellular response indicative of biological control had occurred.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)381-388
Number of pages8
JournalCurrent Genetics
Volume47
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2005

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