Punishment in intimate relationships: does it exist and how does it impact relationship satisfaction?

Julie Peterson

    Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting abstract

    Abstract

    Existing research suggests that punishment may be part of the forgiveness process. Thirty-two couples participated in a “Taste” experiment designed to elicit punishment related behaviour and explore relationships between propensity to punish, marital satisfaction, attachment, fusion and gender. The effects of heightened betrayal related memories on willingness to punish were examined in the experimental group, while willingness to punish was examined after recalling events related to the previous day in the control group. Participants were asked at the completion of the experiment if they had ever punished their partners. Findings were that 100% of participants had punished their partners (verbal acknowledgement), and that significant relationships existed between marital satisfaction, gender and group.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)45-46
    Number of pages2
    JournalAustralian Journal of Psychology
    Volume58
    Issue numberSuppl.
    Publication statusPublished - 2006
    EventAnnual meeting of the Society of Australasian Social Psychologists (SASP) (35th : 2006) - Canberra
    Duration: 20 Apr 200623 Apr 2006

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