Qualitative dimensions of worry in DSM-III-R generalized anxiety disorder subjects and nonanxious controls

Michelle G. Craske*, Ronald M. Rapee, Lisa Jackel, David H. Barlow

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

199 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Revisions to DSM-III cite apprehensive expectation or 'worry' as a defining feature of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). The quality and focus of worry reported by groups of GAD patients (n = 19), and nonanxious 'controls' (n = 26) were examined using self-monitored data. Content categorizations by independent raters showed that GAD patients worried more about illness, health and injury issues and displayed a tendency to worry more about miscellaneous 'minor' issues. These descriptor ratings differentiated the worries of GAD patients from those of non-anxious controls: perceived control over worrying, the extent to which the worry was considered realistic, and perceived success with which worry was alleviated using corrective/preventative actions. The data are related to the DSM-III-R criteria for GAD and to conceptualizations of the nature of excessive worry.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)397-402
Number of pages6
JournalBehaviour Research and Therapy
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes

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