Quantifying the hospitalised morbidity and mortality attributable to traumatic injury using a population-based matched cohort in Australia

Rebecca J. Mitchell*, Cate M. Cameron, Rod Mcclure

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)
11 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Objectives To quantify the 12-month hospitalised morbidity and mortality attributable to traumatic injury using a population-based matched cohort in Australia. 

Setting: New South Wales, Queensland and South Australia, Australia. 

Participants: Individuals ≥18years who had an injury-related hospital admission in 2009 formed the injured cohort. The non-injured comparison cohort was randomly selected from the electoral roll and was matched 1:1 on age, gender and postcode of residence at the date of the index injury admission of their matched counterpart. 

Primary outcome measures: Using linked emergency department presentation, hospital admission and mortality records from 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2010 for both the injured and non-injured cohorts, 12-month mortality and pre-index and post-index injury hospital service use was examined. Adjusted rate ratios and attributable risk were calculated. 

Results: There were 167600 individuals injured in 2009 and admitted to hospital in New South Wales, South Australia or Queensland with a matched comparison. The injured cohort had 3 times higher proportion of having ≥1 comorbidity preinjury, higher preinjury hospital service use, and a higher 12-month mortality compared with a non-injured comparison group. The injured cohort had 2.20 (95% CI 2.12 to 2.28) times higher rate of hospital admissions in the 12months post the index injury admission compared with the non-injured comparison cohort. Injury was a likely contributory factor in at least 55% of hospitalisations within 12months of the index injury hospitalisation. 

Conclusions: Individuals who had an injury-related hospitalisation had higher mortality and are hospitalised at increased rates for many months postinjury. While comorbid conditions are significant, they do not account for the differences in outcomes. This study contributes to informing research efforts on better quantifying the attributable burden of hospitalised injury-related disability and mortality in Australia.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere013266
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalBMJ Open
Volume6
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Dec 2016

Bibliographical note

Copyright the Author(s) 2016. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

Keywords

  • comorbidity
  • health service use
  • hospitalisation
  • injury
  • mortality

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