Questioning in conversations before and after communication partner training for individuals with traumatic brain injury

Kate Mann, Emma Power, Scott Barnes, Skye McDonald, Robyn Tate, Leanne Togher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Background: Social communication training involving individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and their everyday communication partner(s) facilitates improvements in the quality of their interactions and information transfer. Recent research has indicated that the ways conversation partners use questions may play an important role in this improvement.Aims: This study aimed to describe questioning patterns during casual conversations before and after communication partner training using Conversation Analysis.Methods & Procedures: Samples of casual conversations involving four individuals with TBI and their everyday communication partners were examined. These samples were collected before and after intervention in the course of a larger clinical trial investigating the efficacy of a communication partner training program entitled TBI Express. Four dyads were chosen based on their Adapted Kagan Scale scores; a primary outcome measure in the clinical trial. Two dyads with the greatest change on these scales (“Kagan plus”) and two dyads with the least change (“Kagan neutral”) were selected. Approximately 10 minutes of casual conversations per dyad were transcribed in detail. Questions in each sample were identified and analysed qualitatively using conversation-analytic practices, focusing on aspects of sequence organisation.Outcomes & Results: “Kagan plus” dyads had obvious changes in their questioning practices following training. These changes facilitated selection of topics and the development of related talk, i.e., improved communication. Conversely, the “Kagan neutral” dyads exhibited less obvious differences in their questioning practices after training, which meant that improved communication in the postintervention samples was less apparent.Conclusions: The present study provides detailed insight into how everyday communication partners’ questioning practices contribute to communicative success. This information has the potential to help clinicians assess and improve interactions involving individuals with TBI and their everyday communication partners.

LanguageEnglish
Pages1082-1109
Number of pages28
JournalAphasiology
Volume29
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Sep 2015

Fingerprint

Interpersonal Relations
everyday communication
dyad
brain
conversation
communication
Communication
Clinical Trials
conversation analysis
interaction
Quality Improvement
Traumatic Brain Injury
Questioning
training program
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Education
Dyads
Research

Bibliographical note

Corrigendum to article published in Aphasiology 30(7), pp. 877. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2015.1099358

Keywords

  • traumatic brain injury
  • communication partner training
  • questions
  • discourse analysis
  • conversation analysis

Cite this

Mann, Kate ; Power, Emma ; Barnes, Scott ; McDonald, Skye ; Tate, Robyn ; Togher, Leanne. / Questioning in conversations before and after communication partner training for individuals with traumatic brain injury. In: Aphasiology. 2015 ; Vol. 29, No. 9. pp. 1082-1109.
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Questioning in conversations before and after communication partner training for individuals with traumatic brain injury. / Mann, Kate; Power, Emma; Barnes, Scott; McDonald, Skye; Tate, Robyn; Togher, Leanne.

In: Aphasiology, Vol. 29, No. 9, 02.09.2015, p. 1082-1109.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Tate, Robyn

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