Questioning the general self-esteem vaccine

General self-esteem, racial discrimination, and standardised achievement across indigenous and non-indigenous students

Gawaian H. Bodkin-Andrews, Marjorie Seaton, Genevieve F. Nelson, Rhonda G. Craven, Alexander S. Yeung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Psychological research and the popular media culture have repeatedly noted that self-esteem positively contributes to life satisfaction and performance indicators across a large variety of domains. However, while varying measures of self-esteem may be argued to have a positive influence on outcome measures, increasing evidence suggests that perceptions of racial discrimination may also have a negative impact across a wide variety of outcomes. The current investigation used structural equation modelling techniques to examine the potential impact of Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australian students' General Self- Esteem and their perceptions of racial discrimination on spelling and maths achievement. Results indicated that General Self-Esteem displayed little or no significant relations with the performance measures, yet perceived racial discrimination significantly and negatively predicted both spelling and maths achievement for the Indigenous and non-Indigenous students. In addition, no significant latent interaction between General Self-Esteem and perceived discrimination was identified, raising questions for the self-protective properties of General Self-Esteem, at least for achievement outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-21
Number of pages21
JournalAustralian Journal of Guidance and Counselling
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Keywords

  • Education
  • Indigenous australians
  • Invariance testing
  • Latent interactions
  • Perceived discrimination
  • Self-esteem
  • Structural equation modelling

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