Radiation therapy and early breast cancer: current controversies

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Radiation therapy (RT) is an important component of breast cancer treatment. RT reduces local recurrence and breast cancer mortality after breast conservation for all patients and for node-positive patients after a mastectomy. Short courses of RT over 3–4 weeks are generally as effective as longer courses. A patient subgroup where RT can be avoided after conservative surgery has not been consistently identified. A radiation boost reduces the risk of a recurrence in the breast but may be omitted for older patients with good prognosis tumours with clear margins. Axillary recurrences can take a long time to appear, with 35% occurring after 5 years. Leaving disease untreated in regional nodes is associated with reduced survival. Not all patients require radiation after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and a subsequent mastectomy. Modern RT equipment and techniques will further improve survival rates.

LanguageEnglish
Pages216-222
Number of pages7
JournalMedical Journal of Australia
Volume207
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 Sep 2017

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Radiotherapy
Breast Neoplasms
Mastectomy
Recurrence
Breast
Radiation
Survival Rate
Drug Therapy
Equipment and Supplies
Survival
Mortality
Neoplasms
Therapeutics

Cite this

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title = "Radiation therapy and early breast cancer: current controversies",
abstract = "Radiation therapy (RT) is an important component of breast cancer treatment. RT reduces local recurrence and breast cancer mortality after breast conservation for all patients and for node-positive patients after a mastectomy. Short courses of RT over 3–4 weeks are generally as effective as longer courses. A patient subgroup where RT can be avoided after conservative surgery has not been consistently identified. A radiation boost reduces the risk of a recurrence in the breast but may be omitted for older patients with good prognosis tumours with clear margins. Axillary recurrences can take a long time to appear, with 35{\%} occurring after 5 years. Leaving disease untreated in regional nodes is associated with reduced survival. Not all patients require radiation after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and a subsequent mastectomy. Modern RT equipment and techniques will further improve survival rates.",
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Radiation therapy and early breast cancer : current controversies. / Boyages, John.

In: Medical Journal of Australia, Vol. 207, No. 5, 04.09.2017, p. 216-222.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

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