Reading aloud begins when the computation of phonology is complete

Kathleen Rastle*, Jonathan Harrington, Max Coltheart, Sallyanne Palethorpe

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Naming latency experiments in which monosyllabic items are read aloud are based on the assumption that the vocal response is not initiated until the phonology of the entire syllable has been computed. Recently, this assumption has been challenged by A. H. Kawamoto, C. T. Kello, R. Jones, and K. Bame (1998), who argued instead that the reading-aloud response begins as soon as the initial phoneme is computed. This view would be refuted by evidence of anticipatory coarticulation effects on the initial phoneme due to the nature of the following vowel in the speeded reading-aloud task. The authors provide such evidence. Kathleen Rastle, Macquarie Centre for Cognitive Science and Speech, Hearing, and Language Research Centre, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia and Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom; Jonathan Harrington, Max Coltheart, and Sallyanne Palethorpe, Macquarie Centre for Cognitive Science and Speech, Hearing, and Language Research Centre, Macquarie University. Sydney, Australia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1178-1191
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance
Volume26
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2000

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