Real-time concurrent design of adaptive high-frequency circuits

Michael C. Heimlich*, Joel Kirshman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Adaptive circuitry is a popular avenue for extending the reliability, longevity, or parametric performance of many mission-critical systems.' The design of today's adaptive circuits, when at high frequency and digitally controlled, requires consideration of design domains whose tools and methodologies have traditionally been partitioned, separate, and distinct throughout the design process, and have only been integrated at the final phases of development. This paper presents and discusses a new. fully integrated, concurrent design approach for adaptive circuits in communication systems. Using a simple digital attenuator and amplifier in a complex-modulated system as motivation, the design flow concurrently brings together and enables real-time trade-offs among system, circuit, physical (layout), and software issues. The results show that desired performance can be achieved more quickly and easily by simultaneously considering the disparate domains as opposed to the time-consuming traditional incremental methodology.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2005 IEEE Annual Conference on Wireless and Microwave Technology, WAMICON 2005
Subtitle of host publicationconference proceedings
Place of PublicationPiscataway, NJ
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
Pages187-190
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)0780388615, 9780780388611
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005
Externally publishedYes
Event2005 IEEE Annual Conference on Wireless and Microwave Technology, WAMICON 2005 - Clearwater, FL, United States
Duration: 6 Apr 20057 Apr 2005

Other

Other2005 IEEE Annual Conference on Wireless and Microwave Technology, WAMICON 2005
CountryUnited States
CityClearwater, FL
Period6/04/057/04/05

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