Recent collection trends in the Australian higher education sector

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference abstract

    Abstract

    The Council of Australian University Museums and Collections (CAUMAC) recently undertook a sector wide data gathering exercise to connect with key stakeholders and inform future advocacy efforts.

    A total of 400 university museums and collections in Australia were identified in comparison with 268 in the first Cinderella Report in 1996. The higher number probably reflects different research methodologies, improved awareness of university museums and collections, in particular specialist collections held by university libraries, and easier access to museum and collection data. This does not necessarily indicate growth in the sector, although there is some indication of a diversification in the types of collections held.

    This paper will summarise trends in the Australian sector over recent years including, the growth of art collections, the growth of digital and multimedia collections, and the apparent decline of scientific collections. An initial analysis of this data is presented, however, this work sets the stage for more extensive research into the sector that will inform policy and practice regarding university museums and collections in Australia in the future.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publication2012 Museums Australia National Conference
    Subtitle of host publicationresearch and collections in a connected world: conference handbook
    PublisherMuseums Australia
    Pages89
    Number of pages1
    Publication statusPublished - 24 Sep 2012
    EventMuseums Australia National Conference (2012) - University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia
    Duration: 24 Sep 201228 Sep 2012

    Conference

    ConferenceMuseums Australia National Conference (2012)
    CountryAustralia
    CityAdelaide
    Period24/09/1228/09/12

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