Recent developments in bulk waveguide devices fabricated at Macquarie University using ultrafast laser direct-write techniques

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

Abstract

In 1996, it was demonstrated that focussed infrared femtosecond laser pulses can induce a local internal increase in the refractive index of bulk transparent glasses. This discovery offered unique opportunities for the fabrication of arbitrary 3D photonic waveguide devices inside a wide range of materials simply by translating a sample through the focal point of a focussed femtosecond laser beam. Not only can this direct-write technique be carried out rapidly, it is readily compatible with existing fibre systems, it does not require a lithographic mask and it can be conducted in a regular laboratory environment with the minimum of sample preparation. This presentation explores the contributions, carried out at the CUDOS at Macquarie University, to the field of femtosecond laser direct-written waveguide devices and an outlook into future investigations. In particular, studies into writing polarisation, directional couplers, waveguide Bragg gratings, waveguide amplifiers and waveguide laser oscillators will be presented.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 2009
EventLEOS technical meeting on "Technology and applications of ultrafast laser inscription" - Edinburgh, Scotland
Duration: 6 Jul 20096 Jul 2009

Conference

ConferenceLEOS technical meeting on "Technology and applications of ultrafast laser inscription"
CityEdinburgh, Scotland
Period6/07/096/07/09

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    Ams, M. (2009). Recent developments in bulk waveguide devices fabricated at Macquarie University using ultrafast laser direct-write techniques. Abstract from LEOS technical meeting on "Technology and applications of ultrafast laser inscription", Edinburgh, Scotland, .