Recent pause in the growth rate of atmospheric CO2 due to enhanced terrestrial carbon uptake

Trevor F. Keenan*, I. Colin Prentice, Josep G. Canadell, Christopher A. Williams, Han Wang, Michael Raupach, G. James Collatz

*Corresponding author for this work

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    184 Citations (Scopus)
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    Abstract

    Terrestrial ecosystems play a significant role in the global carbon cycle and offset a large fraction of anthropogenic CO2 emissions. The terrestrial carbon sink is increasing, yet the mechanisms responsible for its enhancement, and implications for the growth rate of atmospheric CO2, remain unclear. Here using global carbon budget estimates, ground, atmospheric and satellite observations, and multiple global vegetation models, we report a recent pause in the growth rate of atmospheric CO2, and a decline in the fraction of anthropogenic emissions that remain in the atmosphere, despite increasing anthropogenic emissions. We attribute the observed decline to increases in the terrestrial sink during the past decade, associated with the effects of rising atmospheric CO2 on vegetation and the slowdown in the rate of warming on global respiration. The pause in the atmospheric CO2 growth rate provides further evidence of the roles of CO2 fertilization and warming-induced respiration, and highlights the need to protect both existing carbon stocks and regions, where the sink is growing rapidly.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article number13428
    Pages (from-to)1-9
    Number of pages9
    JournalNature Communications
    Volume7
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 8 Nov 2016

    Bibliographical note

    Copyright the Author(s) 2016. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

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