Regulatory design strategies and enforcement approaches for research involving human embryos and cloning in Australia and the United Kingdom – time for a change

Sonia Allan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper examines regulatory design strategies and enforcement approaches in the context of the UK and Australia’s regulation of research involving human embryos and cloning. The aim is to discuss current regulation in view of the impending review of the Research Involving Human Embryos Act 2002 (Cth) and the Prohibition of Human Reproductive Cloning Act 2002 (Cth). It is argued that the type of regulation used in relation to those who are licensed to research in Australia is unsuitable due to an over-emphasis on deterrence and the authoritarian approach taken by regulatory bureaucracies. The cost and efficiency of the current system is also questioned. The central thesis is that a co-regulatory system that combines the existing framework legislation with self-regulation should be adopted for licence holders. Such regulation of licence holders should include responsive regulatory strategies. ‘Command and control’ design strategies and deterrence approaches present in the current regulatory systems for breaches of legislation by non-licence holders and serious breaches by licence holders should be maintained.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)617-644
Number of pages28
JournalSydney Law Review
Volume32
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes

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