Relationships between populations of Pseudomonas syringae pv. persicae determined by restriction fragment analysis

J. M. Young*, D. S. Jones, M. Gillings

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pseudomonas syringae pv. persicae, the pathogen causing bacterial decline of stone-fruit, was first noted almost simultaneously in France and in New Zealand, together with a closely related pathogen from myrobalan plum in England. The relative similarity of 31 strains from these three countries was examined by comparing DNA restriction endonuclease fragment patterns. Fragment patterns produced from digested DNA samples which were electrophoresed on polyacrylamide gels and visualized by silver-staining, were analysed using the software package Gelcompar. The fragment patterns produced by strains from France and England formed homogeneous but separate groups, while those from New Zealand were relatively heterogeneous. This finding suggests that the New Zealand population of P.s. persicae is older than those found in Europe. Problems in explaining the distribution of the pathogen are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)350-357
Number of pages8
JournalPlant Pathology
Volume45
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1996
Externally publishedYes

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