Reliability, sensitivity and validity of magnitude estimation, category scaling and paired-comparison judgments of speech intelligibility by older listeners

Suzanne Carolyn Purdy*, Chaslav V. Pavlovich

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    4 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This study investigated the reliability, sensitivity, and validity of speech intelligibility judgments for hearing aid evaluation. Subjects aged 60-87 years judged the intelligibility of sentences using either magnitude estimation, category scaling or paired comparisons. The 60+ age group was chosen as representative of the majority of hearing aid wearers. Speech recognition scores for Central Institute for the Deaf (CID) sentences and Northwestern University Auditory Test No. 6 (NU-6) words were also obtained. The speech was bandpass filtered using filter settings that produce a monotonic increase in predicted intelligibility based on articulation index theory. Speech recognition scores and intelligibility judgments were obtained for each of eight filter conditions. Test-retest reliability was poorest for paired comparisons and CID sentence scores. There were no differences in sensitivity among the three psychophysical procedures. Intelligibility judgments and NU-6 scores were more sensitive than CID sentence scores to differences among conditions. The results indicated that intelligibility judgments are valid measures of speech recognition.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)254-271
    Number of pages18
    JournalInternational Journal of Audiology
    Volume31
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1992

    Keywords

    • Category scaling
    • Hearing aids
    • Magnitude estimation
    • Paired comparisons
    • Psychophysical scaling
    • Rating scale
    • Speech intelligibility

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