Religion in Australian politics and society: report on the religion module for the Australian Cooperative Election Survey 2022

Shaun Wilson, Kate Gleeson*, Luke Ashton, Robert Ross

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Book/ReportOther report

Abstract

The role of organised religion in Australia has been debated since the Australian Constitution guaranteed freedom of religion in 1901. In the first half of the 20th century, political expressions of religion focused primarily on sectarian relationships between Protestantism and Catholicism. Post-war migration and policies of multiculturalism since the 1970s dramatically altered the makeup of Australia’s religious communities, as well as the national conversation about the role of religion in public life.

Census data and other sources indicate that overall religious identification is in decline. Results from the Australian Election Study (AES) since 1987 suggest a longer-term trend away from regular religious practice.

The Australian Cooperative Election Survey (ACES) religion module was weighted by population characteristics to approximate representativeness of the Australian voting population. The module included 30 survey items on multiple of aspects religion, power, trust, gender and conspiracies in Australian political and public life. Research on other aspects of religion and conspiracies will be published separately.
Original languageEnglish
PublisherMacquarie University
Number of pages42
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2023

Keywords

  • religion
  • politics
  • public opinion
  • Australia

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