Repetition-lag training to improve recollection memory in older people with amnestic mild cognitive impairment. A randomized controlled trial

Maurice Finn*, Skye McDonald

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The results of a randomized controlled trial of repetition-lag training in older adults with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) are reported. A modified repetition-lag training procedure with extended encoding time and strategy choice was used. The training required discriminating studied words from non-studied lures that were repeated at varying intervals during the test phase. Participants were assessed pre/post using untrained measures of cognition and self-report questionnaires. Primary outcome measures were recall of unrelated word pairs both immediately following presentation and following a delay. Secondary outcomes were a measure of attention, cognitive flexibility, and visual working memory. Participants were also asked to report on the frequency of cognitive failures and mood before and after training. Participants (N = 31) were randomized into either the treatment or a no-contact control group and attended the clinic twice per week over a four week period. Twenty-four participants completed the study (twelve in each group). Results indicated that the training group improved at recalling unrelated word pairs after a delay. There were no significant effects of training on other outcomes, self-reported cognitive failures or mood. The results are discussed along with suggestions for future research.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)244-258
Number of pages15
JournalAging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 Mar 2015
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Erratum can be found at Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition volume 22(1), p i, http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13825585.2014.929366

Keywords

  • amnestic mild cognitive impairment
  • cognitive training
  • elderly
  • randomized
  • repetition-lag training

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