Repetitive element PCR fingerprinting (rep-PCR) using enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) primers is not necessarily directed at ERIC elements

M. Gillings*, M. Holley

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    101 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    We examined the use of enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) sequences in PCR on the DNAs of various bacteria, bacteriophage, invertebrates, fungi, plants and vertebrates and have shown that complex ERIC-PCR patterns can be readily produced from all of these target organisms. A range of annealing temperatures was tested, from 52°C (the commonly used annealing temperature) to 66°C (the approximate T(m) of ERIC primers). At the higher temperatures, most bands failed to amplify, the exception being a subset of bands from enterobacterial targets. It was concluded that ERIC-PCR does not necessarily direct amplification from genuine ERIC sequences.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)17-21
    Number of pages5
    JournalLetters in Applied Microbiology
    Volume25
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1997

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