Resistance to Extinction of Conditioned Odor Perceptions: Evaluative Conditioning Is Not Unique

Richard J. Stevenson*, Robert A. Boakes, Judith P. Wilson

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    102 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    A tasteless odor will smell sweeter after being sampled by mouth with sucrose and will smell sourer after being sampled with citric acid. This tasty-smell effect was found in experiments that compared odor-taste and color-taste pairings. Using odors and colors with minimal taste (Experiment 1), the authors found that repeated experience of odor-taste mixtures produced conditioned changes in odor qualities that were unaffected by intermixed color-taste trials (Experiment 2). An extinction procedure, consisting of postconditioning presentations of the odor in water, had no detectable effect on the changed perception of an odor (Experiments 3 and 4). In contrast, this procedure altered judgments about the expected taste of colored solutions. Evaluative conditioning (conditioned changes in liking) is claimed to be resistant to extinction. However, these results suggest that resistance to extinction in odors is related to the way they are encoded rather than to their hedonic properties.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)423-440
    Number of pages18
    JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition
    Volume26
    Issue number2
    Publication statusPublished - Mar 2000

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Resistance to Extinction of Conditioned Odor Perceptions: Evaluative Conditioning Is Not Unique'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this