Responding to domestic violence in the wake of disasters

exploring the workers' perceptions of the effects of Cyclone Yasi on women

K. James, J. Breckenridge, R. Braaf, I. Barrett Meyering

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Recent international studies suggest that women are more vulnerable to domestic violence (DV) during and post natural and technological disasters. In Australia, a country that is regularly affected by extreme weather events, there have been very few studies into how DV manifests in the context of such events. In this second of three chapters, we report on a study into workers’ perceptions of women’s experiences of DV during Cyclone Yasi and also on the qualitative findings from a nationwide survey of service providers’ perspectives on DV and disasters. Findings were that reports of DV decreased prior to and during the cyclone but increased once it had passed; psychological abuse increased, particularly coercive control; women took opportunities to disclose DV to emergency responders; refugee and Aboriginal women were particularly vulnerable to DV and some women were able to leave violent partners as a result of opportunities provided by the disaster.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIssues of gender and sexual orientation in humanitarian emergencies
Subtitle of host publicationrisks and risk reduction
EditorsLarry W. Roeder Jr.
Place of PublicationCham
PublisherSpringer, Springer Nature
Pages113-124
Number of pages12
ISBN (Electronic)9783319058825
ISBN (Print)9783319058818
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameHumanitarian Solutions in the 21st Century
PublisherSpringer
ISSN (Print)2198-9958
ISSN (Electronic)2198-9966

    Fingerprint

Keywords

  • Domestic violence
  • Disaster management
  • Australia
  • Cyclone Yasi
  • Townsville
  • Women

Cite this

James, K., Breckenridge, J., Braaf, R., & Barrett Meyering, I. (2014). Responding to domestic violence in the wake of disasters: exploring the workers' perceptions of the effects of Cyclone Yasi on women. In L. W. Roeder Jr. (Ed.), Issues of gender and sexual orientation in humanitarian emergencies: risks and risk reduction (pp. 113-124). (Humanitarian Solutions in the 21st Century). Cham: Springer, Springer Nature. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-05882-5_6