Rest-activity rhythms and tract specific white matter lesions in older adults at risk for cognitive decline

Jake R. Palmer, Chenyu Wang, Dexiao Kong, Marcela Cespedes, Jonathon Pye, Ian B. Hickie, Michael Barnett, Sharon L. Naismith*

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    2 Citations (Scopus)
    24 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    White matter lesions (WMLs) are common in older adults and represent an important predictor of negative long-term outcomes. Rest-activity rhythm disturbance is also common, however, few studies have investigated associations between these factors. We employed a novel AI-based automatic WML segmentation tool and diffusion-weighted tractography to investigate associations between tract specific WML volumes and non-parametric actigraphy measures in older adults at risk for cognitive decline. The primary non-parametric measures of interest were inter-daily stability (IS), intra-daily variability and relative amplitude, with the anterior thalamic radiation (ATR), superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) and inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF) selected as tracts of interest. One hundred and eight participants at risk for cognitive decline (classified as experiencing subjective or objective cognitive decline) were included (mean age = 68.85 years, SD = 8.91). Of the primary non-parametric measures of interest, results showed that lower IS was associated with a greater likelihood of higher WML burden in the ATR (OR = 1.82, 95% CI [1.12,3.15]). Analysis of secondary non-parametric measures revealed later onset of the least active period to be associated with greater likelihood of high WML burden in the SLF (OR = 1.55, 95% CI [1.00,2.53]) and increased activity during the least active 5-h period to be associated with a greater likelihood of high whole-brain WML burden (OR = 1.83, 95% CI [1.06,3.47]). This study shows integrity of the ATR and SLF, and overall WML burden is linked to altered rest-activity rhythms in older adults at risk for cognitive decline, with those demonstrating altered rest-activity rhythms showing 50%-80% higher odds of having high WML burden.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)3410-3416
    Number of pages7
    JournalMolecular Psychiatry
    Volume27
    Issue number8
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Aug 2022

    Bibliographical note

    Copyright the Author(s) 2022. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'Rest-activity rhythms and tract specific white matter lesions in older adults at risk for cognitive decline'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this