Revolution or inch-by-inch? Campaign approaches on climate change by environmental groups

Nina L. Hall*, Ros Taplin

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Climate change is a significant environmental, social and environmental problem that has been identified by scientists in consensus internationally. The Australian Government's response is considered by environmental non-government organisations (NGOs) to be inadequate. NGOs are 'change agents' of society, and in this role they are agitating to influence political decision-making on climate change response. This paper outlines the campaign strategies being used by Australian NGOs to attract public and political attention to the issue of climate change. Using seven NGOs as case studies, the archival materials of these organisations were accessed and analysed. Current academic and other literature also was used to reflect on their effectiveness. Four campaign themes and, within these, fifteen activities were identified. The results indicate that the notion of whether NGOs are undertaking an 'revolutionary' or 'incremental' approach, or any other narrow strategic approach put forward by various scholars is too simple for analysing campaigns: none of the NGOs appear to intentionally favour one type of strategy. The question raised by this finding is whether the NGOs' current 'multi-strategic' approach is effective. This research contributes to filling the information gap with regard to NGO campaign strategies on environmental issues, and highlights the need for further research.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)95-107
Number of pages13
JournalEnvironmentalist
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2007

Keywords

  • Australia
  • Campaign strategies
  • Climate change
  • Environmental advocacy
  • Non-government organisations

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