Rights to the diverse city

Challenges to indigenous participation in urban planning and heritage preservation in Sydney, Australia

Sarah W. James*

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Western cities are becoming increasingly culturally diverse through the intersection of processes such as international migration and the political resurgence of Indigenous peoples. The challenge remains, however, to shift from physical copresence to equal rights to the city. This article explores this challenge in an empirical case study of Aboriginal participation in plans for urban development on the fringe of Sydney, Australia's largest city. The findings from this research highlight the limits of official attempts at recognition that focus on a narrow definition of culture to the detriment of economic and political equity. It provides empirical support for a reconceptualization of recognition to incorporate redistribution in order to redress historical marginalization and dispossession that currently limit participation in the urban polity for diverse groups.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)274-287
    Number of pages14
    JournalSpace and Culture
    Volume16
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Aug 2013

    Keywords

    • Australia
    • Indigenous people
    • recognition
    • Rights to the City
    • Urban Planning

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Rights to the diverse city: Challenges to indigenous participation in urban planning and heritage preservation in Sydney, Australia'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this