Rise of the machines: the 2016 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Part II

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearch

Abstract

The Nobel Laureates in Chemistry for 2016 have designed and synthesised molecular systems that can be taken out of equilibrium and into higher-energy states in which their movements can be controlled. Molecular machines will likely lead to nanorobots, sensors, storage devices and perhaps even artificial life.
LanguageEnglish
Pages18-23
Number of pages6
JournalChemistry in Australia
Volume2017
Issue numberMarch
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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Nanorobots
Electron energy levels
Sensors

Keywords

  • Nobel Prize winners
  • Supramolecular chemistry
  • Organic chemistry
  • review

Cite this

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title = "Rise of the machines: the 2016 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Part II",
abstract = "The Nobel Laureates in Chemistry for 2016 have designed and synthesised molecular systems that can be taken out of equilibrium and into higher-energy states in which their movements can be controlled. Molecular machines will likely lead to nanorobots, sensors, storage devices and perhaps even artificial life.",
keywords = "Nobel Prize winners, Supramolecular chemistry, Organic chemistry, review",
author = "Peter Karuso",
year = "2017",
language = "English",
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journal = "Chemistry in Australia",
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Rise of the machines : the 2016 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Part II. / Karuso, Peter.

In: Chemistry in Australia, Vol. 2017, No. March, 2017, p. 18-23.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearch

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