Risk markers for the graded severity of auditory processing abnormality in an older Australian population

The blue mountains hearing study

Maryanne Golding*, Paul Mitchell, Linda Cupples

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A recent report from a population-based survey of hearing loss in 2015 older adults showed that the overall prevalence of central auditory processing (CAP) abnormality was high at 76.4% using abnormality on one or more of seven speech-based test outcomes as the criteria. The present study grouped these test outcomes to reflect increasing severity of CAP abnormality and examined the relationship between this graded dependent variable and 16 independent variables. Logistic regression modeling suggested that moderate and severe CAP abnormality increased with age and was associated with increased hearing handicap, and men were more likely than women to show severe abnormality. While 98.5% of the population passed a cognitive screening assessment, declining cognitive function was still associated with the increased likelihood of CAP abnormality.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)348-356
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Audiology
Volume16
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

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