Road trips, rail journeys and landscape archaeology: reconstructing research itineraries and travel excursions in Italy through the British School at Rome's photographic collections

Janet Wade, Alessandra Giovenco

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This article highlights the importance of photography for landscape archaeology and topographical studies in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and explores the value of photographic collections for the reconstruction of research itineraries and reconnaissance excursions in this period. Photographs held at the British School at Rome are utilized to demonstrate the ways that collections of images can be used to retrace and chronicle the historical paths and itineraries of early researchers in Italy. Several journeys involving pioneers in both topographical studies and the use of photography for landscape archaeology in Italy are discussed. The photographs taken by amateur photographers on these excursions are important visual records of the Italian countryside and its monuments. These images are cultural artefacts themselves and they demonstrate what was still accessible to scholars and archaeologists at the turn of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The historical paths and itineraries of these trailblazers, and the visual and textual records they produced, are now an integral part of the history of topographical studies, landscape archaeology and the Roman roads and countryside of Italy. Through photographs, this article retraces the paths of several of these pioneers and brings their historical journeys to life.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)297-324
Number of pages28
JournalPapers of the British School at Rome
Volume90
Early online date20 May 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2022

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