Role playing vs laboratory deception: a comparison of methods in the study of compromising behavior

Richard M. Rozelle, Daniel Druckman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

A comparison of role-playing vs laboratory deception methods was conducted in the context of varying pressures to compromise one’s religious beliefs in an anticipated negotiation session. Results revealed a subtle interaction effect produced in the laboratory deception condition which was not obtained for the role-playing condition. Other results are discussed, and caution is advised in interchangeably employing both methods.

LanguageEnglish
Pages241-243
Number of pages3
JournalPsychonomic Science
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1971
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

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title = "Role playing vs laboratory deception: a comparison of methods in the study of compromising behavior",
abstract = "A comparison of role-playing vs laboratory deception methods was conducted in the context of varying pressures to compromise one’s religious beliefs in an anticipated negotiation session. Results revealed a subtle interaction effect produced in the laboratory deception condition which was not obtained for the role-playing condition. Other results are discussed, and caution is advised in interchangeably employing both methods.",
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Role playing vs laboratory deception : a comparison of methods in the study of compromising behavior. / Rozelle, Richard M.; Druckman, Daniel.

In: Psychonomic Science, Vol. 25, No. 4, 1971, p. 241-243.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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