Rotator interval closure

inconsistent techniques and its association with anterior instability. A literature review

Shahin Karovalia*, David J. Collett, Desmond Bokor

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

The Rotator interval (RI) is an anatomic space in the anterosuperior part of the glenohumeral joint. An incompetent or lax RI has been implicated in various conditions of shoulder instability and therefore RI has been frequently touted as an area that is important in preserving stability of the shoulder. Biomechanical studies have shown that repair of RI ligamentous and capsular structures decreases glenohumeral joint laxity in various directions. Clinical studies have reported successful outcomes after repair or plication of these structures in patients undergoing shoulder stabilization procedures. Although varieties of methods have been described for its closure, the optimal surgical technique is unclear with various inconsistencies in incorporation of the closure tissue. This in particular makes the analysis of the RI closure very difficult. The purposes of this study are to review the structures of the RI and their contribution to shoulder instability, to discuss the biomechanical and clinical effects of plication of RI structures in particular to anterior glenohumeral instability, to delineate the differences between an arthroscopic and open RI closure. Additionally, we have proposed a new classification system describing various techniques used during RI closure.

Original languageEnglish
Article number8136
Pages (from-to)154-160
Number of pages7
JournalOrthopedic Reviews
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Sep 2019

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Bibliographical note

Copyright the Author(s) 2019. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

Keywords

  • Rotator interval (RI)
  • Rotator interval plication
  • Shoulder instability

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