Routes to party choice

Ideology, economic evaluations and voting at the 1997 British General Election

C. J. Pattie*, R. J. Johnston

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Most conventional accounts of voting behaviour fit single models to the entire electorate, implicitly assuming that all voters respond to the same sets of influences, and do so in similar ways. However, a growing body of research suggests that this approach may be misleading, and that distinct groups of voters approach politics, and the electoral decision, from different perspectives. The paper takes a disaggregated look at voting in the 1997 British General Election, dividing voters into different groups according to their formal educational qualifications. Results suggest that different groups of voters respond to different stimuli, depending on their education, and on the party they are voting for.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)373-389
Number of pages17
JournalEuropean Journal of Political Research
Volume39
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2001

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