Selective learning in a marsupial

A. S. Griffin, Christopher Evans, Daniel Blumstein

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

Abstract

Associative learning is a change in behaviour mediated by the fomation of associative links between events. While it was once thought that learning was independent of the nature of the stimuli involved, it is now well established that animals associate some events more readily than others. This phenomenon, referred to as "preparedness, has primarily been demonstrated using arbitrary stimuli, such as lights and simple sounds. Very few studies have investigated the ability of animals to learn preferentially about biologically-meaningful stimuli, such s predators, and to our knowledge, no study has tested for the presence of such adaptive biases in a marsupial.
Original languageEnglish
Pages28-28
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 2001
Event28th Annual Conference of the Australasian Society for the Study of Animal Behaviour - University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
Duration: 19 Apr 200121 Apr 2001

Conference

Conference28th Annual Conference of the Australasian Society for the Study of Animal Behaviour
CountryAustralia
CityBrisbane
Period19/04/0121/04/01

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