Self-harm hospitalised morbidity and mortality risk using a matched population-based cohort design

Rebecca J. Mitchell, Cate M. Cameron

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Objective: Prior and repeated self-harm hospitalisations are common risk factors for suicide. However, few studies have accounted for pre-existing comorbidities and prior hospital use when quantifying the burden of self-harm. The aim is to quantify hospitalisation in the 12 months preceding and re-hospitalisation and mortality risk in the 12 months post a self-harm hospitalisation. Method: A population-based matched cohort using linked hospital and mortality data for individuals ⩾18 years from four Australian jurisdictions. A non-injured comparison cohort was matched on age, gender and residential postcode. Twelve-month pre- and post-index self-harm hospitalisations and mortality were examined. Results: The 11,597 individuals who were hospitalised following self-harm in 2009 experienced 21% higher health service use in the 12 months pre and post the index admission and a higher mortality rate (2.9% vs 0.3%) than their matched counterparts. There were 133 (39.0%) deaths within 2 weeks of hospital discharge and 342 deaths within 12 months of the index hospitalisation in the self-harm cohort. Adjusted rate ratios for hospital readmission were highest for females (2.86; 95% confidence interval: [2.33, 2.52]) and individuals aged 55–64 years (3.96; 95% confidence interval: [2.79, 5.64]). Conclusion: Improved quantification of the burden of self-harm-related hospital use can inform resource allocation for intervention and after-care services for individuals at risk of repeated self-harm. Better assessment of at-risk self-harm behaviour, appropriate referrals and improved post-discharge care, focusing on care continuity, are needed.

LanguageEnglish
Pages262-270
Number of pages9
JournalAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
Volume52
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2018

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Hospitalization
Morbidity
Mortality
Population
Confidence Intervals
Patient Readmission
Continuity of Patient Care
Resource Allocation
Hospital Mortality
Suicide
Health Services
Comorbidity
Referral and Consultation

Keywords

  • hospitalisation
  • matched cohort
  • mortality
  • Self-harm

Cite this

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title = "Self-harm hospitalised morbidity and mortality risk using a matched population-based cohort design",
abstract = "Objective: Prior and repeated self-harm hospitalisations are common risk factors for suicide. However, few studies have accounted for pre-existing comorbidities and prior hospital use when quantifying the burden of self-harm. The aim is to quantify hospitalisation in the 12 months preceding and re-hospitalisation and mortality risk in the 12 months post a self-harm hospitalisation. Method: A population-based matched cohort using linked hospital and mortality data for individuals ⩾18 years from four Australian jurisdictions. A non-injured comparison cohort was matched on age, gender and residential postcode. Twelve-month pre- and post-index self-harm hospitalisations and mortality were examined. Results: The 11,597 individuals who were hospitalised following self-harm in 2009 experienced 21{\%} higher health service use in the 12 months pre and post the index admission and a higher mortality rate (2.9{\%} vs 0.3{\%}) than their matched counterparts. There were 133 (39.0{\%}) deaths within 2 weeks of hospital discharge and 342 deaths within 12 months of the index hospitalisation in the self-harm cohort. Adjusted rate ratios for hospital readmission were highest for females (2.86; 95{\%} confidence interval: [2.33, 2.52]) and individuals aged 55–64 years (3.96; 95{\%} confidence interval: [2.79, 5.64]). Conclusion: Improved quantification of the burden of self-harm-related hospital use can inform resource allocation for intervention and after-care services for individuals at risk of repeated self-harm. Better assessment of at-risk self-harm behaviour, appropriate referrals and improved post-discharge care, focusing on care continuity, are needed.",
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Self-harm hospitalised morbidity and mortality risk using a matched population-based cohort design. / Mitchell, Rebecca J.; Cameron, Cate M.

In: Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 52, No. 3, 01.03.2018, p. 262-270.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Cameron, Cate M.

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N2 - Objective: Prior and repeated self-harm hospitalisations are common risk factors for suicide. However, few studies have accounted for pre-existing comorbidities and prior hospital use when quantifying the burden of self-harm. The aim is to quantify hospitalisation in the 12 months preceding and re-hospitalisation and mortality risk in the 12 months post a self-harm hospitalisation. Method: A population-based matched cohort using linked hospital and mortality data for individuals ⩾18 years from four Australian jurisdictions. A non-injured comparison cohort was matched on age, gender and residential postcode. Twelve-month pre- and post-index self-harm hospitalisations and mortality were examined. Results: The 11,597 individuals who were hospitalised following self-harm in 2009 experienced 21% higher health service use in the 12 months pre and post the index admission and a higher mortality rate (2.9% vs 0.3%) than their matched counterparts. There were 133 (39.0%) deaths within 2 weeks of hospital discharge and 342 deaths within 12 months of the index hospitalisation in the self-harm cohort. Adjusted rate ratios for hospital readmission were highest for females (2.86; 95% confidence interval: [2.33, 2.52]) and individuals aged 55–64 years (3.96; 95% confidence interval: [2.79, 5.64]). Conclusion: Improved quantification of the burden of self-harm-related hospital use can inform resource allocation for intervention and after-care services for individuals at risk of repeated self-harm. Better assessment of at-risk self-harm behaviour, appropriate referrals and improved post-discharge care, focusing on care continuity, are needed.

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