Self-regulation and social and behavioral functioning following childhood traumatic brain injury

Kalaichelvi Ganesalingam*, Ann Sanson, Vicki Anderson, Keith Owen Yeates

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the impact of childhood traumatic brain injury (TBI) on self-regulation and social and behavioral functioning, and the role of self-regulation as a predictor of children's social and behavioral functioning. Participants included 65 children with moderate to severe TBI and 65 children without TBI, all between 6 and 11 years of age. Self-regulation and social and behavioral functioning were assessed 2 to 5 years following injury. Children with TBI displayed deficits in self-regulation and social and behavioral functioning, after controlling for socioeconomic status (SES), although the magnitude of the deficits was not related to injury severity. Self-regulation accounted for significant variance in children's social and behavioral functioning, after controlling for SES and group membership. Self-regulation may be an important determinant of children's social and behavioral functioning following TBI.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)609-621
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of the International Neuropsychological Society
Volume12
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2006
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Children
  • Injury severity
  • Postinjury outcomes
  • Self-regulation
  • Social and behavioral functioning
  • Traumatic brain injury

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