Semantic processing and the development of word-recognition skills: Evidence from children with reading comprehension difficulties

Kate Nation*, Margaret J. Snowling

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    333 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Children with specific reading comprehension difficulties were compared with control children on tests of language skill. The two groups performed at a similar level on tests requiring predominantly phonological skills, but the poor comprehenders performed less well on tests tapping semantic ability. Although the two groups were matched for decoding ability (as assessed by nonword reading), the poor comprehenders were worse at reading words with irregular spelling patterns and low-frequency words. These results show that despite having adequate phonological decoding skills, poor comprehenders have problems reading words that are typically read with support from semantics. These findings are related to connectionist models of reading development in which phonological and semantic processes interact.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)85-101
    Number of pages17
    JournalJournal of Memory and Language
    Volume39
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jul 1998

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