Serial S-100 protein serum measurements related to early magnetic resonance imaging after minor head injury

Case report

Tor Ingebrigtsen*, Bertil Romner

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

106 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors studied 24 patients with a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 14 or 15 and normal computerized tomography scans after minor head injury. The study protocol included obtaining serial measurements of S-100 protein in serum during the first 12 hours after injury and early magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Four patients (17%) had detectable levels of S-protein in serum. The S-100 protein levels were highest immediately after trauma, declining hour. In two patients, MR imaging revealed intracranial contusion. Levels of S-100 protein were not detectable in serum in one patient with MR- verified cerebral contusion, but the first measurements were made late, 6 hours after trauma. The highest serum level of S-100 protein (0.9 μg/L) was seen in a 73-year-old man 2 hours after injury. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a contusion of the left cerebral hemisphere, and the patient suffered permanent sequelae of impaired posture and dizziness.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)945-948
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery
Volume85
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1996
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • computerized tomography
  • head injury
  • magnetic resonance imaging
  • outcome
  • S-100 protein

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